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Yamashika Yoshiyuki

 
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MessagePosté le: Mer 19 Déc - 02:21 (2012)    Sujet du message: Yamashika Yoshiyuki Répondre en citant

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
Je n'ai pas le temps de faire un topo pour le moment, je colle donc ici quelques infos et liens, bruts de décoffrage. 
 
 

 
 
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biwa_h%C5%8Dshi 
 
 
http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~repercus/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/repercussions-Vol.-3-No.-1-de-Farranti-Hugh-Speaking-of-Yamashika.pdf 
 
 

 
 
 
Scholarly tribute to ‘the last biwa singer’

In a recently-published study, Hugh de Ferranti has interpreted the history and documented the demise of a centuries-old tradition of oral performance in Japan.
His book – The Last Biwa Singer – is not only a valedictory analysis of that tradition as personified by Yamashika Yoshiyuki (1901-1996), but also a celebration of the process of composition-in-performance itself. Within the book is an implicit plea for a greater understanding of such oral performance traditions, and thus their preservation not as cultural relics but as living forms of artistic expression.
Allan Marett, Professor of Ethnomusicology at Charles Darwin University and Emeritus Professor (Musicology) at the University of Sydney, officially launched The Last Biwa Singer at the University of New England, where Dr de Ferranti is an Associate Professor in the School of Arts. Professor Marett spoke about the pride he had felt, as the supervisor of Dr de Ferranti’s PhD thesis on the blind musicians of Japan’s Kyushu province, on reading the book. “It’s the culmination of a journey that Hugh and I started together,” he said.
“Yamashika was the last person to have earned his living in Japan as a blind musician performing a repertoire of tales, songs, and religious rites accompanying himself on the biwa (a four-stringed lute),” Dr de Ferranti said. “He became well known as ‘the last biwa hoshi‘, and was the subject of books, television programs, and a feature-length documentary film. An apparent living relic of a long-vanished Japan, Yamashika also appeared in The New York Times in his last years.”
Professor Marett praised Dr de Ferranti’s insights, gained through conversations with Yamashika and analysis of his repertoire, into the true nature of the biwa singer’s performances – insights that help to correct the official “nationalistic” view of such performances as idealised “cultural relics” of a literary and musical canon.
On the contrary, the picture of the biwa singer’s art that emerges from the book is one of dynamic oral composition – traditional tales virtually recreated in the course of each telling, according (among other things) to the singer’s prior knowledge of his audience and his interaction with them during the performance.
“It is through comparison of multiple performances of a tale that the question of composition-in-performance can be addressed,” Dr de Ferranti explains in the book. “What are the common elements in each performance, what differences are there, how do they occur, and why? In examining this problem one is not trying to establish any ‘standard’ or definitive form of the piece, but to establish how different versions of the piece come about.”
“The unfolding of the tale anew in each performance gives it its power,” Professor Marett said, deploring the loss of that “power” with the demise of such performance traditions. “All extinctions – biological or cultural – impoverish us and threaten our survival as a species on this planet,” he concluded.
The Last Biwa Singer: A Blind Musician in History, Imagination and Performance, is published by Cornell University (Ithaca, New York) as No. 143 in the Cornell East Asia Series.
Clicking on the image (a section of the book’s cover) displayed here reveals a photograph, taken at the UNE book launch, of Associate Professor Hugh de Ferranti (left) and Professor Allan Marett.
 
 
 
   

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 



Yamashika Yoshiyuki ‎– Rites & Tales With Biwa
Label:
Victor Entertainment Japan – VZCG-8377~9
Format:
3 × CD, Album 

Country:
Japan
Released:
25 Apr 2007
Genre:
ClassicalFolk, World, & Country
Style:
StoryReligiousFolk



Tracklist▼












1-1

ワタマシ [Watamashi]

23:33

1-2

道成寺 [Dôjôji]

29:11

2-1

菊池くずれ [Kikuchi Kuzure] 一段~三段

50:59

2-2

菊池くずれ [Kikuchi Kuzure] 五段より

19:51

3-1

あぜかけ姫 [Azekakehime]

59:08

3-2

インストルメンタル [Instrumental Excerpt]

1:55



Credits▼
  • Narrator [語り], Biwa [琵琶] – 山鹿良之*
  • Other [Liner Notes - English, Japanese] – Hugh De Ferranti
  • Other [Liner Notes - Japanese] – Hyôdô Hiromi, Kimura Rirô

Notes▼
1-1 recorded on July 31, 1963; 1-2 on October 14, 1989 at Yamashika's home; 2-1, 2-2 & 3-2 on September 26, 1974 at RKK Kumamoto Broadcasting Studio; 3-1 on October 6, 1970 at Yamashika's home.
Includes a 58 page booklet of lyrics and notes in Japanese and English.
'The music on this CD-set is a selection of recordings representative of the repertory of Yamashika Yoshiyuki (1901-1996), a blind musician and ritualist of Nankan-chô in central Kyushu's Kumamoto prefecture. As the last person to have earned his income from performing a repertory of narratives, songs and rites with biwa, to many he seemed to be a twentieth-century apparition of the medieval biwa hoshi - blind singers associated in Japanese popular culture with the carnage and strife that led to the start of warrior rule in the late twelfth century. Yamashika's identity as a musician and individual was far more complex, but from the mid-1970s he became well known as 'the last biwa hoshi', and was the subject of several books, television programmes, and an award-winning documentary film.'
























Title: 

THE LAST BIWA SINGER: A Japanese Blind Musician in History, Imagination and Performance

Authors: 

de Ferranti, Hugh
Paradisec

Keywords: 

biwa
song
singer
japanese
musician
Yoshiyuki
Yamashika
blind

Issue Date: 

2009

Publisher: 

Cornell University East Asia Series

Citation: 

THE LAST BIWA SINGER: A Japanese Blind Musician in History, Imagination and Performance. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University East Asia Series, 2009.

Abstract: 

This book concerns the traditions of Japanese blind musicians and ritualists who accompanied themselves on the biwa, as embodied in the music and identity of Yamashika Yoshiyuki (1901-1996). Yamashika was the last person to have earned his income from performing a repertory of musical tales, songs and rites with biwa (a four-stringed lute), and to many seemed like a twentieth-century apparition of the blind bards who first performed the Tale of the Heike and other canonical medieval narratives. Yamashika’s identity as a musician and individual was far more complex, but he became well known as "the last biwa hōshi" and was the subject of books, media programs, and a feature-length documentary film. An apparent living relic of a Japan long vanished, Yamashika even appeared in the New York Times in his last years. The author draws upon approaches from Japanese historical and literature studies, performance studies and ethnomusicology in an examination of history, which yielded on the one hand images of blind singers that still circulate in Japan and on the other a particular tradition of musical story-telling and rites in regional Kyushu, of representations of Yamashika in diverse media, of his experiences training for and making a living as a professional performer and ritualist from the 1920s on, and of the oral compositional process in performances made between 1989 and 1992.

Description: 

Item HDF1-YY46-A from the Paradisec archive - Yamashika performance of the second dan of the tale "Shuntokumaru", recorded March 7th, 1989.

URI: 

http://hdl.handle.net/2123/5389

Department/Unit/Centre: 

Paradisec

Appears in Collections:

Research Papers. PARADISEC








 
 
 

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